gen z: is this accurate?

As I said in class, this article analyzes generation z a bit harshly in my opinion.

Read the article:  http://au.lifestyle.yahoo.com/marie-claire/features/world/article/-/8223607/meet-generation-z/

Respond to it.  Select one specific claim by the author and either support it or refute it with examples from real life.

When finished with your own post, respond to at least 2 other posts.

About dceac

Denver Christian High School Seminar Program
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50 Responses to gen z: is this accurate?

  1. Anonymous says:

    While this article was a little on the harsh side, I think the majority of it was true, especially about their need for technology. For example, last summer I went to Georgia to visit my family. We went to my aunts house to visit some cousins. The older ones sat around catching up with family, but the first thing my eight-year-old cousin did was ask me for my phone so she could play games on it. She knows how to turn on the WiFi, download apps, and navigate through any and every game. No one even had smartphones when I was eight. She then spent the entire afternoon and the two hour drive home playing games on my phone until it died. When anyone would try and talk to her she would rudely shush them and continue on with her game, getting angry when you tried to take it away from her. The scary part, though, is that she’s not the only one like this. Her entire generation is like this. They feel this need to always have technology and get bored playing normal games like Life or doing puzzles. If they don’t get what they want, they whine and cry far beyond what should be acceptable for someone their age. I feel that this generation is far too immature for the ages they are and are spoiled rotten. Hopefully their parents do try and turn this all around; otherwise they will really be in for a surprise when they realize that in real life you don’t always get what you want, especially when you want it.

    Becky

    • Anonymous says:

      I see the same things happening even with my little sister. She still throws tantrums and she doesnt always want to take no for an answer. I feel like most kids, including her today just think they need what they want and theyll do anything to get it. I think that kids today are getting increasingly lazy. They try to get out of work, putting it off until the last minute or waiting for their parents to step in and do it for them.

      -Brody

    • Nicole says:

      I agree with this and I think it’s crazy that little kids are able to work games and videos on phones and computers. The more they learn how to do the more they are going to want. This generation is getting selfish, not caring if their fun games drain the battery of someone else’s phone. They don’t realize that everything is not made for only their enjoyment.

    • Anonymous says:

      I agree! The article said that this generation has a tiny attention span, which I personally think stems from technology. The fact that I can play temple run, stalk someone on facebook, tweet about stalking that person on twitter, and look up something on Safari all in the matter of minutes is kind of alarming. And I wasn’t even immersed with technology in my delivery room like these generation z’s. I can’t imagine how much more reliant on technology the world can get.

      Hannah

    • Anonymous says:

      I agree with you on the fact that the article, and I find the story about your cousins to be very scary. We, as parents of the near future, need to make sure that our kids are good leaders of tomorrow.
      -Simon

  2. Anonymous says:

    This article is harsh on Gen Z, but I’ve definitely seen some examples of it being true. Their need for tech, toys and the newest thing always takes precedence over their social skills and families. But some of the blame could go to the parents as well. According to the article, parents want to be friends, not parents. This causes major issues. Friends usually share the same ideas and don’t say no to eachother. This is the problem parents are facing. they dont want to say no, so the children grow up thinking theyll always get what they want, and when they grow up a harsh reality check will occur. I thought it was shocking how a mother argued over her son getting in trouble for hitting another kid with a metal ruler. This is a perfect example of how parents just really dont know how to be a parent, and then I think about how this new generation will parent their children and it genuinely scares me.

    -Brody

    • Anonymous says:

      I agree that we can’t really blame the kids for the way they are. Yes, they are the ones with the attitude problem… But if you never get punished for being rude or whatever, you will never understand how much of a problem it can be. In trying to be friends with their own children, parents are actually making it harder on their kids because once they do grow up, the world will be very different than they expected.

      Becky

      • Anonymous says:

        I agree with you Brody and Becky, you can’t really blame the kids on the way they were raised. Some questions that your article raised was “why are the parent’s suddenly being too lax on their parenting?” and “what caused this?” Was it the affects of the generation who raised the parents today or can it be traced back all the way to the Greatest Generation?

        Hannah

    • Anonymous says:

      I agree that adults cannot punish or blame children who need to learn from adults. I don’t know why the culture occurs in our society. According to some articles, most children without education, cause something like mistake, fault and even crime. However, the shocking thing is that they avoid the responsibility for their faults and pass it to adults like their children. I think we need to think about the culture is true or false, and try to change it into true way.

      James Jee

  3. Anonymous says:

    This article is just as harsh as it is true. One comment that really stuck with me was that generation Z is the “most demanding, acquisitive, materialistic and entitled generation we have ever seen”. Ok, so every child (in America) demands for random things, but is this generation more demanding than any other? I’m going to vote probably. Just walk into any store… I’m sure you’ll hear at least one screaming kid begging…no demanding for something. Generation Z is also incredibly acquisitive, which by the way means greedy (yes, I did look that up), and materialistic. For example, Generation Z’s are the kids that have an iPhone, iPad, laptop, and whatever else a SEVEN year old “needs”. Also, this generation is entitled. Um, yeah they…(we?) are. I know that when I want something, I automatically deserve it. I can’t even explain why, it’s just that I’m Hannah Miller, I deserve that. Maybe it’s just me personally, but I highly doubt it. And lastly, something this article said that I thought was funny and true was “when you don’t have to wait to be heard, you can say a lot of good, interesting things.” I think this sums up this generation, they don’t have great manners (probably because they are still kids) but they sure are clever.

    Hannah

    • Anonymous says:

      I agree, many kids in this generation get what they want. This means the more they get, the more they want, so the get more and more demanding in a big circle. I know that when I want something I feel like I deserve it too, but I think we all have the realization that we dont really need it. We have the self-control for demands that kids in Gen Z lack. They have no sense of not being able to have anything and everything they want, and its scary.

      -Brody

    • Nicole says:

      I agree with this completely. Little kids are walking around these days with their own iPads, laptops, and iPhones. Of course they don’t need them but they think they do. It’s also a social status thing and always one-upping their friends I think.

    • Erin says:

      I agree with you Hannah. I think most kids (including myself sometimes) walk around like they can get anything they want, when they want it. It’s a huge part of our culture today.

  4. Anonymous says:

    I agree that the next generation is highly demanding. They lack the self-control to say I want that but I guess i can pass on it. Parents aren’t helping, they just want the kid to be happy and thats whats causing them to be so demanding. Ill admit that I say I deserve something that I want, but I know that sometimes I dont need it, or I can live without it

    -Brody

  5. Nicole says:

    This article is mostly true in my opinion. One example that I found is that everything has to be equally fair for every kid today. It’s largely looked down upon if a kid gets something slightly better than their peer. In the article it used the example that at sporting events every kid gets a ribbon these days no matter their skill level. I can back this up fully. When I had field day in elementary school, the ribbons I received depended on how well I did in my events earlier that day. Now, in kindergarten at least, every kid gets the same ribbon just for participating. There is no 1st or 2nd place. Parents pushed for this so their kid wouldn’t feel bad if they didn’t get a first place like their friends. I think this is a nice thought but they need to learn sooner or later that they can’t be good at everything. Everyone has their own skills and they need to be acknowledged.

    • Anonymous says:

      I agree with you Nicole. Many of Generation S’s parents are from Generation X themselves; the pessimistic generation. Perhaps it is this pessimism that leads Generation X parents to encourage high self-esteem in their children. I think they have the right idea; it’s good for kids to have high self-esteem. But I think they are going about establishing that in the completely wrong way. Rather than kids feeling good about themselves, they feel the same as everyone else, not necessarily special. I think the parents’ intents are back-firing on them and kids simply get upset when they do not get the same thing as everyone else.

      Becky

  6. Anonymous says:

    I do not think this article was harsh, I think it was true. I don’t believe all children nowadays are all selfish, pampered brats, but I believe many of them are. I think there was an excellent point brought up when the author said that young children and even teens nowadays are not as harshly disciplined, but are spoiled and become all the worse for it. You would think that by now, people would recognize that the more an individual acts out, the more strict the judgement needs to be. I will admit that I am, although not as badly so as some of the examples in the article, spoiled to a certain degree. Even though I, and most of the rest of culture, wouldn’t like it, I think we need to be more strictly disciplined for our mistakes. I am having a hard time trying to come up with my own examples of blatant misbehavior and signs of being spoiled, at least in front of large groups. I am blessed to say that my parents, nor my parents relatives would allow such a thing. However, an easy example to provide is the abundance of technology. We, as a culture, completely rely on technology to accomplish the simplest of tasks nowadays. I have had a smartphone since last Christmas. I love it, but at the same time, it scares me. I use it way too much, and I almost rely on it. Going a week without a phone seems harder than a week without food sometimes. I don’t think we should take a step back in the technological area, but I think we need to control it in some way.
    -Simon

    • Erin says:

      I agree with your post completely. I think that this generation is very spoiled, and not as harshly disciplined, which will probably hurt us in the long run.

      • Bri says:

        I completely agree with what you said. I think it’s scary how much we rely on technology. We value it so much that it almost becomes more important to us than the things needed to stay alive. I think that we should try to push off all the technology a little bit so we know how to actually function without it if a phone were to die or something.

    • Luke says:

      You made a very good opening comment. I would also agree that not all kids are spoiled and selfish. You made a good point near the end about technology and how it has become so important and necessary to our daily lives. I also think we need to learn how to control our usage of technology, but I think that comes down to the parents and moral choices.

  7. Erin says:

    Although this article is harsh, it’s pretty true. The point I found most true is that kids need everything to be fair. They want what they don’t have, and everything should be equal with them and their friends. I see this everywhere, even in myself and my brothers. A lot of times we feel like we don’t have as much things, or the coolest new technology. Sometimes, it’s not even in materialistic things. For my youngest brother, he always have to have his fair share of time using something, or he thinks he has the right to stay up later because I can. He needs to be first in line, because last time his friends were. It’s crazy, and I see this everywhere. I think everyone feels like they are just as important as anyone else, and their skills need to be acknowledged too.

    • Anonymous says:

      You make an excellent case. We have really taken “all men are created equal” to an extreme level. Kids think they can live their lives as adults and have no regard for their elders. We feel this entitlement to be equal to or even better than the best. Sometimes I wonder if humility or respect is even in the vocabulary of most kids.

      -Allison (2nd period)

    • Anonymous says:

      I agree with your opinion because I think that is true in our life. They always try to be fair with other people and even their parents. Because of that, children want to be independent from their parents though they need to be protected from many dangers in society, by their parents.

      • Anonymous says:

        James Jee

        • Katie O says:

          We have taken the idea that everything needs to be fair to a new level. What I find surprising is that people very few people just say that “No, its not fair.” We go out of our way to make people believe we are being fair.

    • Kaylee says:

      I agree with this becasue when kids say that something is not fair, parents don’t say anymore “well life is not fair” instead they make it fair for their children.

  8. Merissa says:

    I agree that this article was very harsh on Generation Z, but also believe it made some valid points. The author states at one time that “happiness is the ultimate goal, to be pursued at all costs.” I believe that this a very common thought of people in our world today, and almost everyone’s goal in life is to just find their happiness. This shows the importance of self in American culture today, and how most people live their lives trying to please themselves, and not worrying about others.

    • Anonymous says:

      I don’t think the article was unfair to our generation, each time they stated a negative thought, a reason for it was followed. We do have a generation of “little emperors but this is because of the way we have been raised. The article does make a very valid point in defense of our generation by saying parenting has decreased alot. Parents, ecspecially divored or busy, feel the need to be their kid’s friend. What a kid really wants is a parent, even if they don’t think it at the time. Parents are falling into traps and pressures because of exhaustion. There also is a fear of confronting their child because it may harm them and backfire. The truth is, by not teaching the kids and letting them learn from their mistakes, the kids are backfiring on them. They demand for more, quicker, and lack self control. I agree that we have been raised to believe in a fairytale lifestyle, not preparing us for the harsh reality.

      -Allison (2nd period)

      • Hayden says:

        I agree with Allison, I myself have witnessed a parent trying to become “friends” with their kids. One example of this is my step-mom who has two little girls. She hates to punish her kids, probably because she does not really totally want to lose her control on them and be against her. I think there is a thin line between being a “friend” and being a parent. In some cases its alright to be a “friend” but it should not effect how they parent.

        • Kaylee says:

          I agree with Hayden that there is a fine line between being a parent and being a friend to your children. I also think it is okay to be a friend to your kid but when the time comes to disipline them you should no longer treat them as your friend.

      • Thanh Nguyen says:

        I agree with you. It seems like parents nowadays don’t really know what they should be toward their kids. They are helpless because they don’t have time and chance to think about it. I think their problems is how to balance and evaluate reasonably their role as friends or parents.
        In my opinion, before the influence of the society and the culture; the family’s education is the fundamental and important thing from which kids begin to build their own characters and awareness about everything surrounding them: how they should behave, how they see and solve the problem, how they think about that aspect of life. Kids’ minds are like blank paper which can easily record and be affected by everything surrounding them. Kids can easily be worse if they don’t have some stable support from family, the closest place for them. Therefore even if they can aware this or not, they really need someone who can help and guide them gradually, without giving too much pressure and discipline, or “homework” ,like school. That’s when they need the help from their parents.
        But also, kids don’t want things going at home as strictly as school, they only need someone who can listen to them and sympathy, understand them and encourage them, like a friend. Not a normal friend but a best friend who kids can believe in no matter what. That’s when they need their parents become their friends. Protecting and supporting are the best things family can do for not only a kid, but also for everyone.
        But then, I agree with you that parents also have their pressure and stress from work and life. They are really stuck when life demands them too much time and effort to reach their goals. So it’s hard for them to regulate and complete their roles towards their children. And it’s easy to create the common tendency of excessive pampering and misconception of self-esteem, as a new way to offset and satisfy kids; leading to some bad results and consequences which the article mentioned and discussed about.

    • Anonymous says:

      Happiness has become America’s new motto. We strive to fulfill ourselves with, not character, but physical achievements. Kids have been raised to step on other people’s toes to accomplish what they strive for. Strong lessons of building character and sense of awareness for others are lacking in our generation.
      -Allison (2nd period)

    • Luke says:

      You made some very good points! One point that I would agree with is the fact that we are becoming more and more focused on “self”. I would completely agree with that statement. I also found it interesting that you said we are becoming a culture of finding happiness. A very good post in my opinion.

  9. Anonymous says:

    I think happiness is not only American culture or thought. Happiness is the final goal of most people. However, the difference is happiness for one (or self) and happiness for all. So, individual and personal culture of America affect to the happiness for one. The culture is harsh, I think. Though education doesn’t teach Americans the happiness, but the culture are teaching them and being spred to the world. Because of that, everyone all around the world try to live themselves and try to be happy for themselves.

    James Jee

    • Bri says:

      I agree with what you said. We try to find happiness by buying the newest, coolest thing but we never become happy because there is always something bigger and better. We think that we will find satisfaction through our possessions but we are never happy with what we have because of what our peers may own that’s better.

      • Hayden says:

        Generation Z is the generation that never fails. The author discusses that children are no longer failing. Instead of f’s in school, which people say are to harsh to give to kids they award a “gold star” for trying. In my opinion this in its self is setting kids up for failure later in life. Failure is helping kids in life. It’s important to fail because the kids can learn from their mistakes. Mistakes teach kids perseverance. Mistakes also teach kids how to emotionally deal with their struggles and to take a step back and try-try again.

  10. Bri says:

    I found this article to be harsh but also very true. The one thing that stood out to me as being pretty accurate was the quote “They look to Hollywood as a realistic picture of what they should have.” It seem like nobody is happy with what they have because there is always something bigger and better that Hollywood stars have. We think that the way they live their lives is the way we should live our lives; being pampered and getting everything they want. We live in a world now where we know everything about all the biggest celebrities through magazines and the T.V. Since it’s all around us, we want to have the same possessions because we think that maybe we too can have the same popularity. As Americans, we like to own the newest, biggest thing because we then feel better about ourselves.

    • Hayden says:

      I agree with Bri, we as Americans want the newer, bigger, shinier things in life. People do look to Hollywood to see what’s cool because we want to behead of the curve. We want people to see that we are a trend setter and we are the ones to follow around and be popular.

    • Anonymous says:

      I agree with you totally. I believe that we continually shove images of the life of luxury into the faces of our young ones, setting a horrible example. What do you think is going to happen when we don’t have a big paycheck coming in, our house isn’t amazing, and our car is unattractive? We buy better things with money we don’t have.
      -Simon

    • Mikey says:

      Yeah, kids see the Hollywood kids on TV, and think that they can act like them too!!!! Then when they are old enough to see that the TV show is not real, they see the kid celebrities and they’re like, “I wanna be famous! I wanna be like that!” But obviously that most likely isn’t going to happen to them… But it’s what they want.:(

  11. Thanh Nguyen says:

    Although the article is a little harsh to talk about Generation Z but I think it tells alot of truth about this generation. For example, I agree with the opinion which said about some parents from generation X, who are always busy with their works, feel guilty because they can not spend enough time for their kids, so they try to satisfy their kids’ demands as much as possible to offset the emptiness and lack of love which they had left behind for their kids. I have a true story about my cousin in Vietnam, who is now 10. His parents is always busy because of their jobs as managers of 3 famous seafood restaurants in the city. Because of the lack of time for their son, they try to give him all he wants, from the big collection of comics and toys, to some “expensive toys for a kid” such as Ipad and Iphone even though he just uses it for playing games. As I see in the way my aunt and my uncle educate their son, I can tell it is very negative for him. He does not seem to appreciate but feel loveless with what he is given and even asks for more and more because he thinks he does deserve to have what he wants and it is his parents’ duty to satisfy him – their only son. Meanwhile, my aunt and my uncle do not seem to realize what they had done for their son because they think by doing that way, their son can understand their love for him and they can also express their responsibilities as the parents. When my cousin broke his Iphone and asked for another one and then lost it again in few weeks later, my aunt did not even criticize him or tell him to be more careful with such expensive things like that, she just again bought for him the new one because she thought he was just a kid and his fault was normal for every kid. This misconception can lead to the very bad results. First of all, my cousin has been unknowingly infected with the extravagant spending habits on the money he had not made by himself. Secondly, he is more and more relied on his parents and someday it will be hard for him to accept the loss or failure in life by himself.
    From the story of my cousin, my opinion is that: Although children from generation Z are living in a luckier and more modern life when the children rights are always preferred and respected by the society and culture, it is very necessary to let them know how precious the value they are given now, compared with their parents and previous generations. And the most important thing the parents can do for their kids is to help the kids feel satisfied and happy with what they have, and guide the kids to have a positive and active tendency to develop and live independently, not always depended on their parents. It will be better for the kids if they are given something more stable and long-lasting from their parents such as love, sympathy knowledge and experience, to live the right way, rather than the satisfaction of material but nothing after that to live and stay strongly by themselves.

  12. Katie O says:

    Yes this article is harch, but I see it as acurate. What really stuck me as true is what they talked about punishing your kid. Parents are often afraid that they wont be loved or be friends with their kids, but you arent supposed to be your child’s friend in my opinion, you are their parents. This is a major difference that needs to be enforced. When a kid is young I believe they need boundries and rules, because with out them the kid becomes more and more intollerable. I’ve seen this with my own cousins. Their parents and grandparents have given them everything, my six year old cousin has an iPhone, that they dont know how to take rejection. This has come back to haunt their parents now that they are starting to punish their kids and the kids just dont believe they would do that. I cant keep watching children act this way and parents just accepting it. boundries need to be set and parents need to step back from trying to be their kid’s friends and back to their kid’s parent.

    • Lauren (2nd) says:

      I can agree with a lot of this. My mom always tells me horror stories about how she was punished as a child but now this is highly looked down upon. If children complain, then the parents just give them what they want rather then dealing with it.

  13. Lauren (2nd) says:

    I think there are some good points in here. Probably the biggest thing I saw was that in the beginning they say a lot about how now the mind set is ‘F’s are too harsh and we should use ‘E’ instead and everyone getting a ribbon in a sporting composition. I feel like this isn’t all the children’s fault. They just complain, like everyone does, and the parents respond by complaining to higher powers rather then with comfort or good advice. By doing this parents show children that they can get what they want by acting out and complaining. However, a lot of points they made are just children being children. They have short attention spans and can’t sit still. They said that Generation Z is born from 1995-2009. That means that they are only between 3-17 years old. Yes, technology is readily available but most are too young to really use it. I have a four year old baby sister, and yes she can unlock my mom’s iPad and start a game but things like computer use and internet browsing is still far from her. I really simply just don’t think they are old enough to be judged. However, if everything continues as it does then maybe this will be accurate. Since no one of generation Z is really an adult yet then maybe this will change. People can change a lot from the time they are children/teenager to adulthood.

  14. Anonymous says:

    I agree with this article, one thing that caught my attention was the story about the teacher with her kindergarten class. When she asked one of the little boys to do his homework when he was messing around, he got in a temper tantrum and told the teacher “you can’t make me.” I thought this was unacceptable behavior and that a parent would raise their kid like that. The parents of Generation Z are going easy on their kids and letting them behave the way they are with little or no punishment. Because they think it is fine or they think that their kid won’t want to be their friend or love them. This shows that Generation Z is changing American culture by the way kids behave now.
    Kaylee

  15. Luke says:

    I see this as a very harsh yet somewhat accurate of an article. I would agree with some of the points made by the author in the first few sentences. On the other hand one claim that I do not agree with is that “parents do their kids homework”. I don’t think parents that really care about their children’s education would do the homework assigned to the child. I believe the author made a very broad statement by saying that. Yes, I do believe parents are helping children with their studies today more than ever but by no means to I think “they are doing it for them”. I am included in this generation and from my experience I have not met one student who has their parents do the homework assigned to the student. My experience has been one of the parents making more of an influence on the student to actually do the homework and not to “do the homework for them” This was a very interesting article that I thought made some good points and some points that I would not agree with.

  16. Thomas says:

    I think that while some of the things said in this article were true, many were overly broad, or just plain wrong. Like the part when it talks about how kids today are like freaky ambitious, and that they think they’re going to get everything, I’ve seen the opposite be true. I see most people telling kids to get their heads out of the clouds and start being serious, “Go and get your degree in business administration or accounting, and when your done with that you can go and die on the inside.” But while that was false, I defiantly agree that kids attention spans are diminishing, they can’t seem to pay attention like older people. I also think the article ignored the fact that most of the kids growing up in this generation are going to be freaky well informed on a variety of subjects due to the easy access of knowledge these days.

  17. Joshua Rossi (2nd Period) says:

    I think this book is an accurate depiction of Gen Z. Although there we some harsh accusations against thing generation there are many kids who do many of the things that this article describes. Like when it was talking about the frustrated teacher in the beginning and how she couldn’t get her students to rad a piece of information that she needed them to. Instead the students have their cellphones out and are messing around and being very disruptive. I think we see that less in the older students but for sure in the younger students.

    • Mikey says:

      I agree… The younger generation is learning that texting is what the ‘cool’/older kids do. They do it even more to try to be cool, but everything goes downhill from there…

  18. Mikey says:

    “That focus on boosting children’s self-esteem is ‘one of the great problems of the age’, says Mackay. ‘We’re not talking about self-respect. Self-esteem says kids have to feel good about themselves regardless of what they’ve done. So-called ‘positive psychology’ has created a happiness industry – gold stars for everybody, always praise, never criticise, never talk about failure. It’s completely absurd and this generation of kids is the victim of that movement because they’ll be less equipped to cope with the inevitable failures and disappointments of life.’

    This statement, to me, is one of the most relevant things in the article. I see it almost every day… Kids get what they want, but only to stop their tantrums… They start crying, you give them a toy… WHY? To boost their self-esteem.
    The kid steals a balloon from a store……. You get angry and talk it away…….. They cry and won’t stop… Their eyes look so cute and forgivable………… You either give them the balloon back to them or hug them, trying to comfort them, and giving them a cookie if you have to………….. They shut up………….. You are happy… You just learned what to do when the kid is upset.
    WRONG!!!! this also teaches them what to do to get what they want, and this is why the kids in our culture expect so much from us… and on top of that, expect to be happy all the time…
    Another thing that contributes to them learning that having a high self-esteem is good is the media. TV shows, like Jessy, or other kids TV shows like it, show rich kids getting what they want all the time. The kids on TV throw tantrums to get what they want and such….

    Sooooo yeah, I agree with the article that this is what the kids are like, but I think that it needs to stop!

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